Skip to main content

For the past two years, I have been studying chiropractic at London South Bank University (LSBU). I am now halfway through my MChiro degree and I am excited to start my third year when I hope to spend more time focusing on the development of my clinical skills. Recently, the Covid-19 pandemic has impacted everyone in a multitude of ways. Our semester at LSBU was cut short and the remaining lectures, as well as our exams, were delivered online. This has been a stressful time, but there has been a lot of support from the school and the professional bodies for chiropractors and chiropractic students, including the GCC. Now that examinations are completed, one of my main concerns is what things will be like when year three begins in September. I am hopeful that we will find a way to continue our learning safely.  

When I was still in high school, I initially considered a career as a medical doctor, but after discovering chiropractic I felt that the holistic approach encompassed everything I wanted to get out of being a healthcare provider. For me, the hands-on approach of chiropractic care combined with a host of different types of job opportunities and specialities really stood out.

I moved to London to study at the age of 17. As the course at LSBU was brand new, we have always worked closely with the GCC, who visit every year to check in with our course directors and with students.

Throughout the course so far there has been a great integration with working clinics in London, including mandatory placements from year one. We are also lucky enough to have Dr Polly Hand and Dr Owain Evans join us for some of our technique classes. Getting to learn from them alongside our lecturers has been a real benefit. 

One of the things I have found most challenging as part of my course is finding self-confidence in my clinical skills. Sometimes I feel that I am lacking in strength, but my tutors are very supportive and have encouraged me to try modifications to certain techniques. This is also one of the huge benefits of working directly with different chiropractors, as they can demonstrate their modifications. In particular, Dr Polly Hand has inspired me as her technique is a great testament to the fact that smaller women can provide incredibly powerful and effective chiropractic adjustments. 

In contrast, the things I have most enjoyed so far are learning how the human body works and ‘solving’ general diagnosis cases. I find these practice cases intriguing and I enjoy approaching them like a puzzle. It is also a great opportunity to apply the anatomy and physiology that we learn about in lectures in a clinical scenario. My involvement with the World Congress of Chiropractic Students has also been a highlight of my student experience and I look forward to continuing this. 

In my opinion, student life in London is a unique experience when compared to other universities around the country. Because the university is so central it feels well integrated with the surrounding professional industries. And one of the best things about being in the capital is that you will never run out of cool things to see and do. 

I am still unsure of exactly what I would like to do when I graduate, but it is great to already feel like I am being integrated into the chiropractic industry. I look forward to attending more conferences in my third year of study to explore further the different possibilities within chiropractic as a profession.  

For anyone considering studying chiropractic, I would highly encourage you to do so. As I have discovered, not only is it an incredibly interesting subject to study, but the profession is wonderfully supportive and there will always be opportunities for you to develop the aspects of your career that you enjoy most – both as a student and a graduate.

Alison McLuckie - Student at London South Bank University.

Comments

  • 02.07.2020 at 11:35

    This is very useful for anyone wanting to study Chiropractic.

    Mike

  • 02.07.2020 at 11:58

    Very inspirational.

    A.Stoichkov@gcc-uk.org

  • Post a new comment